Senators blast UnitedHealth CEO for lackluster cybersecurity, monopoly – NU PropertyCasualty360

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UnitedHealth CEO Andrew Witty (above) testifies in front of senate and committee members about Change Healthcare cyberattack by AlphV. The vulnerable platform hackers used to access sensitive information at Change did not meet the security guidelines prescribed by the FBI and U.S. cyber and health officials issued in Dec. 2023, which warned about AlphV/BlackCat focusing on healthcare organizations. (Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg) UnitedHealth CEO Andrew Witty (above) testifies in front of senate and committee members about Change Healthcare cyberattack by AlphV. The vulnerable platform hackers used to access sensitive information at Change did not meet the security guidelines prescribed by the FBI and U.S. cyber and health officials issued in Dec. 2023, which warned about AlphV/BlackCat focusing on healthcare organizations. (Photo: Al Drago/Bloomberg)

U.S. lawmakers questioned UnitedHealth Group’s chief executive officer, Andrew Witty, on May 1 over the devastating cyberattack on its subsidiary Change Healthcare in February. The attack crippled the U.S. healthcare system for several weeks, affecting health insurers, hospitals, doctors, pharmacies, patients and the finances of all parties. UnitedHealth recently admitted to paying a $22 million ransom in Bitcoin to the cybercriminal gang responsible, AlphV. However, some documents were still released in April when slighted threat actors asked for more money. The full impact of the cyberattack on Change remains unknown, but Witty gave senators a closer look at when and how AlphV gained access to its system.

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